Prehistoric artifacts suggest a neolithic era independently developed in New Guinea

New artifacts uncovered at the Waim archaeological web-site in the highlands of New Guinea – including a fragment of the earliest symbolic stone carving in Oceania – illustrate a shift in human habits involving 5050 and 4200 several years in the past in reaction to the widespread emergence of agriculture, ushering in a regional Neolithic Period very similar to the Neolithic in Eurasia. The area and sample of the artifacts at the web-site recommend a fixed domestic area and symbolic cultural tactics, hinting that the region started to independently create hallmarks of the Neolithic about 1000 several years before Lapita farmers from Southeast Asia arrived in New Guinea. Though experts have identified that wetland agriculture originated in the New Guinea highlands involving 8000 and 4000 several years in the past, there has been minimal evidence for corresponding social variations like those that happened in other areas of the entire world. To superior comprehend what existence was like in this region as agriculture distribute, Ben Shaw et al. excavated and examined a trove of artifacts from the recently recognized Waim archaeological web-site. “What is certainly interesting is that this was the very first time these artifacts have been discovered in the ground, which has now permitted us to decide their age with radiocarbon courting,” Shaw mentioned. The scientists analyzed a stone carving fragment depicting the brow ridge of a human or animal encounter, a full stone carving of a human head with a bird perched on top (recovered by Waim citizens), and two ground stone pestle fragments with traces of yam, fruit and nut starches on their surfaces. They also recognized an obsidian core that provides the very first evidence for prolonged-distance, off-shore obsidian trade, as properly as postholes where home posts might have when stood.

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